Narragansett Phrases and Vocabulary

"In 1643, Roger Williams wrote A Key into the Language of America. It is an anthropological study of 17th century American Indian culture, a phrase book of the Narragansett language, and a commentary on 17th American Indian life during the early colonial period." - NPS.org Lesson Plan on A Key into the Language of America

With assistance from Dawn Dove from the Tomaquag Museum, listen as we help you learn the proper pronunciation of key words and phrases from the Narragansett Indians' language as captured in Roger Williams's seminal book.


Greetings

Neèn, Keèn, EwòI, you, he
Asco wequássinGood morrow (hello)
AskuttaaquompsìnHow doe you?
AsnpaumpmaûntamI am very well
Taubot paumpmaúntamanI am glad you are well.
CowàmmaunshI love you

 

Numbers

Nquít one
Nneèsse two
Nìsh three
Yòh four
Napànna five
Qútta six
énada seven
Shwósuck eight
Paskúgit nine
Piùck ten
Nquit pâwsuck 100

 

Family

Nnìn Man
Wuskeène A youth
Wásick Husband
Weéwo Wife
Nòsh My father
Nókace, nitchwhaw My mother
Nippapoos My child
Muck quachuckquêmese a little boy
Squásese a little girl
Weémat a brother
Wéticks a sister

 

Environment

Aûke Earth or Land
Níttauke My Land
Mihtúck–quash Trees
Wattáp A root of trees
Seíp A river
Takêkum A spring
Tataggoskìtuash A fresh meadow
Maskitituash Grass or Hay

 

Weather/Seasons

Taúkocks Cold weather
Káusitteks Hot weather
Sókenun Raine
Tópu A frost
Sóchepo Snow
Aukeeteámitch Spring, or Seed-time
Quaqúsquan Summer
Taquònck Fall of leafe and Autumne
Papòne Winter

 

Food

Wuttáhimneash Strawberries
Ewáchim – neash Corne
Ashaūnt-teaūg Lobsters
Opponenaūhock Oysters
Sickìssuog Clams

 

Respect

Netompauog Friends
Keèn ka neen You and I
Miawêtuck Let us meet.
Téaquacumméich What will you eat?
Cuppítous I understand you
Coanâumwem You speake true

 

English words from Native American languages

Moose
Raccoon
Bayou
Caucus
Chipmunk
Eskimo
Hickory
Moccasin
Muskrat
Pecan
Skunk
Squash
Tepee
Toboggan
Tomahawk
Totem
Woodchuck